Max Ernst

10 06 2015

As my art teacher used to say, Max you’re too earnest. Or was it serious. Ernst was a serious artist. He left his wife and son and moved to Paris where he settled into  ménage à trois with the Éluards. I don’t know who the Eluards were but I’m sure they were wonderful people. The war started. When Ernst  wasn’t being chased around by the gestapo he did a lot of work. They chased him to America. The woman he left behind, Leonara Carrington, had a nervous break down. The woman who took him to America, Peggy Guggenheim, married him. But the marriage didn’t last long. He divorced Peggy and married Dorothea Tanning. He started to have success as an artist and stopped getting married.

The Eye of Silence

 

Surrealism and PaintingMax Ernst Paintings Art





Max Ernst

30 12 2013

It is always fun and interesting to have a look at Ernst’s work. His use of story line in his collages has had a huge affect on both artists and writers. And the birds…

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Max Ernst

20 07 2012

As my art teacher used to say, Max you’re too earnest. Or was it serious. Ernst was a serious artist. He left his wife and son and moved to Paris where he settled into  ménage à trois with the Éluards. I don’t know who the Eluards were but I’m sure they were wonderful people. The war started. When Ernst  wasn’t being chased around by the gestapo he did a lot of work. They chased him to America. The woman he left behind, Leonara Carrington, had a nervous break down. The woman who took him to America, Peggy Guggenheim, married him. But the marriage didn’t last long. He divorced Peggy and married Dorothea Tanning. He started to have success as an artist and stopped getting married.

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Max Ernst

13 03 2011

You can’t help running into Max Ernst’s work. For one thing, he has a fabulous name for a surrealist. And his work is always fascinating, fun, and unexpected.

I quote from the history of collage.

Max Ernst discovered the process of surreal collage in 1919, using Victorian engravings (many originally made from photographs), … “I was struck by the obsession which held under my gaze the pages of an illustrated catalogue … It was enough at that time to embellish these catalogue pages, in painting or drawing, and thereby … transformed into revealing dramas my most secret desires from what had been before only some banal pages of advertising.” Ernst credited Max Klinger (1857-1920), a Symbolist painter, as the inspiration for his collages. Many of Ernst’s collages might better be termed composites – because many strive for a seamless consistency.