Leo Dohmen

28 01 2017




Janusz Maria Brzeski

27 01 2017

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I just had brain surgery…

26 10 2016

i-just-had-brain-surgery





Karel Teige

25 01 2016




Horace Pippin

10 07 2015

Horace Pippin (February 22, 1888 – July 6, 1946) was a self-taught African-American painter. The injustice of slavery and American segregation figure prominently in many of his works.

A Pennsylvania State historical Marker was placed at 327 Gay St., West Chester, Pennsylvania to commemorate his accomplishments and mark his home where he lived at the time of his death.[1]

He was born in West Chester, Pennsylvania, and grew up in Goshen, New York. There he attended segregated schools until he was 15, when he went to work to support his ailing mother.[2] As a boy, Horace responded to an art supply company’s advertising contest and won his first set of crayons and a box of watercolors. As a youngster, Pippin made drawings of racehorses and jockeys from Goshen’s celebrated racetrack. Prior to 1917, Pippin variously toiled in a coal yard, in an iron foundry, as a hotel porter and as a used-clothing peddler.[3] He was a member of St. John’s African Union Methodist Protestant Church.

Pippin served in the 369th infantry, the famous Harlem Hellfighters, in Europe during World War I, where he lost the use of his right arm after being shot by a sniper. He said of his combat experience:

I did not care what or where I went. I asked God to help me, and he did so. And that is the way I came through that terrible and Hellish place. For the whole entire battlefield was hell, so it was no place for any human being to be.

I love this guy’s work, his story telling, and his humility as an artist.





Palmer Hayden

7 07 2015

Palmer C. Hayden (January 15, 1890 – February 18, 1973) was an American painter who depicted African-American life. He painted in both oils and watercolors, and was a prolific artist of his era.

Hayden took his inspiration from the environment around him, focusing on the African American experience. He tried to capture both rural life in the South, as well as urban backgrounds in New York City. Many of these urban paintings were centered in Harlem. The inspiration for “The Janitor Who Paints” came from Cloyde Boykin, a friend of Palmer’s. Boykin was also a painter who supported himself through janitorial work. Hayden once said, “I painted it because no one called Cloyde a painter; they called him a janitor.” Many people consider this painting to be an expression of the tough times Palmer was having.

I love this guy’s story telling.





John Heartfield

30 06 2015

Of the Berlin group, John Heartfield remains the best known and revered as a result of his single-minded devotion to anti-Nazi political activism. However, his early montages were collaborative efforts that resemble the work of all the other Dadaists. He and George Grosz experimented with cut-up pieces of newspaper and photos of their fellow artists, and produced many of the early designs for Dada posters and manifestos.





Umberto Brunelleschi

6 06 2015

Umberto Brunelleschi (June 21, 1879 – February 16, 1949) was an Italian artist. He was born in Montemurlo, Italy, studied at the Accademia delle Belle Arti in Florence and moved to Paris in 1900 with Ardengo Soffici where he soon established himself as a printer, book illustrator, set and costume designer.

He worked for Le Rire as a caricaturist (often under the pseudonym’s Aroun-al-Raxid or Aron-al-Rascid) and was a contributor to many of the deluxe French fashion publications including Journal des Dames et Des Modes, La Vie Parisienne, Gazette du Bon Ton and Les Feuillets d’Art. Brunelleschi was also the artistic director of the short lived but significant La Guirlande d’art et de la litterature 1919-1920.

After serving in the Italian Army during the First World War, he returned to Paris. In the 1920s he diversified into set and costume designs for the Folies Bergère, the Casino de Paris, the Théâtre du Châtelet and theaters in New York, Germany, and in his native country. In Italy, he worked for Opera Houses such as La Scala in Milan, and the Maggio Musicale Fiorentino in Florence. He created costumes for Josephine Baker. He is also noted for his design of the Martial et Armand logo c. 1923.

His illustrated books include Voltaire (Candide, 1933), Charles Perrault (Contes du temps jadis,1912), Musset (La Nuit Vénitienne), Goethe, Diderot (Les Bijoux indiscrets, etc.), Les Masques et les personnages de la Comedie Italienne, 1914; Phili ou Par dela le Bien et le Mal,” 1921; Le Radjah de Mazulipatam,” 1925; Le Malheureux Petit Voyage, 1926; and Les Aventures de Roi Pausole, 1930.

Umberto Brunelleschi died 1949 in Paris, France.





Edward Burra

26 05 2015

One of the oddest and most interesting artists I have come across.





George Hugnet

25 05 2015

Hugnet was part of the surrealist movement in the 30s. He was later expelled from the group. In a lot of his work he seems preoccupied with females. But he does little with the form. Like a lot of early collages, his work appears frantic, slapped down in a  hurry to give an impression of a lack of concentrated thought. As if the images did not come from intelligence but impulse.