Arunas Zilys

4 11 2015

Arunas Zilys creates mysterious paintings of haunting beauty. “Birdman”, “Guardian Angel”, “Offerings”–these popular Zilys titles invite you into another world. Fantastic hybrid creatures stalk through a pointillist landscape of vivid paintbox colors. Calmly they stare out from the canvases, inviting you to join them on their mysterious quests. Symbols and myths swirl about in a mosaic of meaning. The unique visions of Zilys, once viewed, are tattooed on your heart indelibly. They echo, like an ancient dream.





Arturo Elena

4 11 2015

Arturo Elena

 





at home

4 11 2015





the kid

4 11 2015





The Queen and her silly puppies

4 11 2015





Pals at a massacre…

4 11 2015

Pals at a massacre





Anne-François-Louis Janmot

4 11 2015

Take away the Christian meaning of these paintings, and looking at them visually, they are very bizarre.

Anne-François-Louis Janmot (21 May 1814 – 1 June 1892) was a French painter and poet.

Janmot moved to Paris in 1861 after having been promised a commission for the Church of St. Augustine, but this project was abandoned three years later. In experiencing significant family and financial problems, Janmot accepted a professorship at the Dominican School of Arcueil. At that time, in his home in Bagneux, he made many portraits of the members of his family (only photographs are currently available).

After the birth of her seventh child in August 1870, his wife died in Bagneux. While the Prussian troops approached and occupied his home, he fled to Algiers with his stepfather and made landscape paintings. He returned in June of the following year in Paris and led a solitary life. His house in Bagneux had been looted. In 1878, he produced a fresco in the chapel of the Franciscans in the Holy Land, but this work was followed by any further order.

Faced with family and increasing financial problems, Janmot came to Toulon, and despite some orders (new Portrait of Lacordaire (1878, Museum of Versailles), Rosaire (Saint-Germain-en-Laye, 1880), Martyrdom of St. Christine (Solliès-Pont, 1882), he lived a retired life. He finished the second part of the Poem of the Soul that the patron and former industrial Félix Thiollier was willing to publish.

In 1885, Janmot married a former student, Antoinette Currat, and returned to Lyon. He made charcoal drawings on the theme of the underworld, which can be regarded as a kind of continuation of the Poem of the Soul, including Purgatory (1885) and The End of Time (1888). In 1887 was published in Lyon and Paris an over 500-page book entitled Opinion of an artist on art and includes articles previously written by Janmot. He died five years later at the age of 78.