Yayoi Kusama

13 06 2012

This is one strange artist. A cross between Cher and Yoko. She’s quite mad. But in a Walt Disney way.

The Daily Norm

Tate Modern has gone all polka dot – and I’m not talking about the impending arrival of Damien Hirst. No, no, another artist, similarly best-selling and awfully contemporary, but perhaps less readymade, and stemming all the way from Japan claims that she made polka dots her artistic trademark long before Hirst made the colourful dots his personal emblem with LSD . And she’s probably right, because for Yayoi Kusama, the eccentric, self-admitted mental-institution resident and world famous artist who is the subject of Tate Modern’s latest retrospective exhibition, the polka dot was not just emblematic of her early and continuing artistic career, but represented the hallucinations looming inside her troubled head.

Welcome to Kusama world, a world where an artist’s output is not the product of imagination, but mental torture. Famous for her immersive installations, phallic representation, neon-bright colours and those all-embracing polka dots, Kusama is acutely successful in being…

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Wilfred Satty

13 06 2012

Satty was part of the California art scene in the 1970s. You can see it in his work. It both reflects that time and seems a prisoner of it. Perhaps this is one of those cautionary tales. What seems cool at the time may age poorly. I know I have. Though my wife disagrees, the mirror has another story.

Satty is dead.

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Tony DiMauro

13 06 2012

Tony DiMauro tells stories. And they are not easy stories. They are sad, tragic, horrific. The pieces themselves have the unsavoury eroded look. Like the subjects of his work, the paintings themselves look tested and tired.

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