Danny Cohen

30 09 2011

This is one wacky guy. He must be the Steve Martin of photographer/artists. His work is fun. He doesn’t have fart jokes but …

check out his sight. http://dannycohen.com.au/#251152/About-Danny-Cohen

This slideshow requires JavaScript.





Yellow Submarine

29 09 2011

I remember we all went to see this animation. And loved it. We went to see anything with the Beatles. And we were stoned. Yellow Submarine was not really a Beatles’ creation. I think they took some of the creature ideas from John and music from the group. I don’t know that any of the music was written specifically for the movie. But it had a huge affect on people. Animation for one thing was taken more seriously as an art. It popularized paisley. And it made ‘LSD’ seem like a harmless drug that could only lead to peace, love, and patterns. It was a terribly naive view of life. Although I would say that the ‘blue meanies’ still scare me today. Especially in their offices. In the bank.





Scott Musgrove

29 09 2011

I didn’t know what to think of Musgrove’s work when I first saw it. It was fun. Whimsical in fact. But it seemed to stop short of being… vicious. Teeth were bared but that was the extent of the violence. Then it came to me. These would be perfect images for children. They would love them. Reminded me of some of the illustrations for “Yellow Submarine”.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.





Leszek Bujnowski

29 09 2011

Leszek Bujnowski is a Polish photographer who creates these wonderful surreal images. His obsession would seem to be the vanishing point, a ‘point in a perspective drawing onto which parallel lines appear to converge’. That is, he is obsessed with something that doesn’t exist. Or at least it does not exist in the ‘real’ world. But we operate under the assumption that it does exist. Like most people’s relationship with God. And there is something about Bujnowski’s work that seems to have that spiritual aspect. Or maybe its because I haven’t had a coffee. Or that I’m under the weather. God is like Kleenex. I keep reaching for him.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.





John Brophy

28 09 2011

These pieces by John Brophy are very beautiful. His purpose was to contrast the beauty of the women against the message (propoganda) that they carry. Would these paintings then see the light of any church’s stained glass windows? Would they be appreciated by those who hold the Christian faith in great reverence? The artist is being naive if he does not see the new message that seems inherent in all the pics. And that is hypocrisy. That the church (or church members) looks up to Mary for guidance. And then commits terrible acts of violence and cruelty. Personally I appreciate truth. Even if it means that the things I have loved or brought up on have been tarnished.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.





Sergey Tyukanov

28 09 2011

Mr. Tyukanov’s work is whimsical, almost playful. But it is derivative. I have inserted some Bosch work. I am sure Mr.  Tyukanov is aware of this. He has a beautiful web sight. But the music is very annoying. Its like grocery shopping. And maybe that’s the message. Products.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.





Hannah Hoch

27 09 2011

One of the original dadaists, she struggled most of her life to gain respect for her work. This struggle was due mostly to her sex. In a male/machismo world a woman artist always had to fight against the hidden  unacknowledged prejudices of her male colleaques. Her work is very interesting. And I think it suggests that she had a better eye for visual ideas and wasn’t handcuffed to intellectual frameworks. I sound like I write for Wikepedia. I like this woman. There is something… contemporary about her work.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A trailer for a film about this artist

and a short film about her work